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2

How brain uses timing during motor activity revealed by birdsong study

from MNTneuro - 13 Dec 14

Timing is key for brain cells controlling a complex motor activity like the singing of a bird, finds a new study published by PLOS Biology.



3

Moderate alcohol benefits: only for 15% of population

from MNTcvs - 15 Nov 14

A new study confirms that moderate alcohol consumption can protect against coronary heart disease, but only for the 15% of the population that have a particular genotype.



2

Researchers discover type of toxic flame retardant in Americans for first time

from MNToncology - 15 Nov 14

By finding a way to test urine for phosphate biomarkers, researchers have identified a previously undiscovered toxic flame retardant - TCEP - in Americans.



2

Trial results reveal first targeted treatment to boost survival for oesophageal cancer

from Cancer Research News - 05 Nov 14

Press release Patients with a specific type of oesophageal cancer survived longer when they were given the latest lung cancer drug, according to trial results being presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference today (Wednesday). Up to one in six patients with oesophageal cancer were found to have EGFR duplication in their tumour cells and taking the drug gefitinib, which targets this fault, boosted their survival by up to six months, and sometimes beyond. "It’s



2

Solution to 14-year mystery has implications for cancer therapies and drug delivery

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

Do blood vessels that feed tumors differ from other blood vessels? Fourteen years ago, experiments designed to answer that question led to the discovery of several genes that are more active in...



2

Improved understanding of glioma may lead to more efficient and specific therapies

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain.



2

Finding could lead to treatments for channel-related diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy and Parkinson's

from MNTcvs - 30 Oct 14

A common protein plays a different role than previously thought in the opening and closing of channels that let ions flow in and out of our cells, researchers at Johns Hopkins report.



2

Scientists trigger self-destruct switch in lung cancer cells

from Cancer Research News - 31 Oct 14

Press release Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells - paving the way for new treatments, according to research that will be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool next week*. “Igniting the fuse that causes lung cancer cells to self-destruct could pave the way to a completely new treatment approach." - Professor Henning Walczak. When healthy cells are no longe



2

How "trained immunity" mediates BCG therapy of bladder cancer

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is a vaccine widely used in low and middle-income countries to protect against childhood tuberculosis.



2

Navigation and location can occur without external cues

from MNTneuro - 30 Oct 14

Researchers from The University of Queensland have identified the amount of information the brain needs in order to navigate and accurately estimate location.



2

Text messaging could motivate Latino adults to exercise

from MNTcvs - 30 Oct 14

Latino adults at risk of heart disease exercise more after receiving motivational text messages five days a week, a pilot study suggests.Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 13.



2

Nano ruffles in brain matter

from MNTdementia - 30 Oct 14

An accumulation of a protein called amyloid-beta into large insoluble deposits called plaques is known to cause Alzheimer's disease.



2

Clinical practice guidelines address multimodality treatment for esophageal cancer

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) has released new clinical practice guidelines for treating cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (area where the esophagus meets the stomach).



2

New technology shows promise for delivery of therapeutics to the brain

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World...



2

Aortic valve replacement appears safe, effective in very elderly patients

from MNTcvs - 30 Oct 14

Aortic valve replacement (AVR) can safely be used to treat severe aortic stenosis in patients age 90 years and older and is associated with a low risk of operative stroke and mortality, according...



2

Health experts: perfect storm of diabetes and tuberculosis must be headed off

from MNTdiabetes - 30 Oct 14

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) and the World Diabetes Foundation have released a report calling for international action against a looming co-epidemic of...



2

Expectant mothers with epilepsy face tough choices over their medication

from MNTepilepsy - 30 Oct 14

A new study published in The Cochrane Library, highlights the difficult decisions women with epilepsy have to face when they become pregnant.



2

Improved understanding of glioma may lead to more efficient and specific therapies

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain.



2

Risk of ruptured appendix for young children increased by poor access to general surgeons

from MNTgastro - 30 Oct 14

Delayed treatment for appendicitis can often lead to a ruptured appendix. That's exactly what is more likely to happen to many children in North Carolina if they have to delay getting treatment...



2

Pediatric radiation exposure following Chernobyl disaster linked to aggressive thyroid cancers

from MNToncology - 30 Oct 14

For the first time, researchers have found that exposure to radioactive iodine is associated with more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer, according to a careful study of nearly 12,000 people in...



2

Women more likely than men to dismiss chest pain and delay seeking medical help for heart symptoms

from MNTcvs - 30 Oct 14

When heart symptoms strike, men and women go through similar stages of pain but women are more likely to delay seeking care and can put their health at risk, according to a study presented at the...



2

Less invasive robotically assisted bypass surgery reduces complications and recovery time

from MNTcvs - 30 Oct 14

Robotically assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is a rapidly evolving technology that shortens hospital stays and reduces the need for blood products, while decreasing recovery...



2

Neurohormonal activation and its relation to outcomes late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

from Heart - 30 Oct 14

Related Articles Neurohormonal activation and its relation to outcomes late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Heart. 2014 Oct 28; Authors: Heng EL, Bolger AP, Kempny A, Davlouros PA, Davidson S, Swan L, Uebing A, Pennell DJ, Gatzoulis MA, Babu-Narayan SV Abstract BACKGROUND: Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are elevated in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF), the clinical significance of which remains uncertain. ME



2

Survival by stroke volume index in low-gradient normal EF severe aortic stenosis: insights into myocardial systolic dysfunction.

from Heart - 30 Oct 14

Related Articles Survival by stroke volume index in low-gradient normal EF severe aortic stenosis: insights into myocardial systolic dysfunction. Heart. 2014 Oct 28; Authors: Rodrigues JC, Ghosh Dastidar A, Rohan S, MacIver DH PMID: 25351508 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



2

Gene 'switches' could predict when breast cancers will spread to the brain

from Cancer Research News - 05 Nov 14

Press release Scientists have found a pattern of genetic ‘switches’ – chemical marks that turn genes on or off - that are linked to breast cancer’s spread to the brain, according to research* presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool today (Wednesday). "Tackling the problem of brain metastases is one of the greatest challenges facing breast cancer researchers" - Dr Abeer Shaaban The researchers, based at the University of Wolverhampton, studied 24 breas


 

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