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Genetics link a mother's diet to the risk of obesity in her offspring

from MNTpaeds - 05 Sep 14

New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that epigenetic methylation blocks expression of the Pomc gene, leading to delayed satiety response and increased food intake.



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Is your child prepared for the September Asthma Peak

from MNTpaeds - 04 Sep 14

With the end of the summer upon us, school-aged children are beginning to head back into the classrooms for a new school year.



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Hidden infection route of major bacterial pathogen uncovered

from MNTcf - 04 Sep 14

Researchers at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health have discovered the pattern of infection of the bacterium responsible for causing severe lung infections in...



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Is human breast milk microbiome 'neutral'?

from MNTpaeds - 04 Sep 14

Human breast milk is considered the most ideal source of nutrition for infants and it should have played a critical role in the evolution and civilizations of human beings.



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A child's auditory brain function improves with two years of musical training

from MNTpaeds - 04 Sep 14

A new Northwestern University study provides the first direct evidence that a community music program for at-risk youth has a biological effect on children's developing nervous systems.



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Hypertension is a nearly 6 fold risk factor in obese youths

from MNTpaeds - 03 Sep 14

Obese youths have a nearly six fold risk of hypertension, according to research in more than 22 000 young people from the PEP Family Heart Study presented at ESC Congress by Professor Peter Schwandt...



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Unplanned births out of hospital increases risk of infant mortality

from MNTpaeds - 03 Sep 14

New research reveals that unplanned births out-of-hospital in Norway are associated with higher infant mortality.



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Food supplements plus cash to poor families reduces rates of child malnutrition in Niger more than each intervention alone

from MNTpaeds - 02 Sep 14

In Niger, interventions that combined the distribution of supplementary food with a cash transfer to poor families prevented acute malnutrition in young children more effectively than strategies...



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Infant feeding habits may predict eating behaviors in later life

from MNTpaeds - 02 Sep 14

The follow-up to an FDA study analyzing infant nutrition investigates to what extent eating behaviors in the first year of life predict eating behaviors at age 6.



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Potentially protective immune response from new analysis of old HIV vaccines

from MNTpaeds - 02 Sep 14

Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results.



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Breakthrough in RSV research

from MNTpaeds - 02 Sep 14

The New England Journal of Medicine has published research results from a clinical trial of a drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally...



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ADHD drugs 'do not stunt children's growth,' say AAP

from MNTpaeds - 01 Sep 14

Despite concerns that stimulant medications to treat ADHD could stunt a child's growth, a new study from the American Academy of Pediatrics says these drugs do not affect height.



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Bedsharing may impair sleep quality

from MNTpaeds - 01 Sep 14

Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse.



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Somatic Forward (Nonrevertant) Mosaicism in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

Revertant somatic mosaicism is a recognized phenomenon in patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and other inherited diseases. It occurs when spontaneous mutations result in correction of a germline mutation that underlies the genodermatosis, leading to phenotypic reversion and sometimes functional improvement. Revertant mosaicism occurs though several mechanisms, all causing a nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information from the parent cell to the daughter cells. Gene conversions, intrageni



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Dermatology Mobile Applications More Than Just Patient Education

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

To the Editor We read with interest the research letter by Cohen and colleagues that described a mobile application (app) to provide peer-reviewed education to individuals with acne and to identify users’ characteristics. As noted in the research letter and accompanying commentary, mobile apps have significant potential to provide information to large numbers of dermatology patients. However, these apps can and should go far beyond the role of surveying users and providing information and basic



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Error in Byline

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

There was an error in the byline of the Notable Note titled “Tungiasis: ‘The Greatest Curse That Has Ever Afflicted Africa’” in the July issue of JAMA Dermatology (2014;150[7]:708. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.176). The byline should have read “Fabrizio Vaira, MD, Gianluca Nazzaro, MD, Stephano Veraldi, MD.”



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The Indefensible Defense Enzyme

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

The Journal of Cutaneous DiseasesSeptember 1914THE ABDERHALDEN TECHNIQUE AS APPLIED TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS.By H. R. Varney, M.D., and P. F. Morse, M.D., Detroit.J Cutan Dis. 1914;32(9):624-629.



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Remembering World War I Joyce Kilmer’s Trees

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I. There were 116?516 American military personnel killed in this war, including Alfred Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918). He is better known simply as Joyce Kilmer and for his beloved poem called Trees, which begins:



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Leprology and Betrayal in Shakespeare’s Hamlet

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

Before Hansen discovered the lepra bacillus in 1873, there had been dozens of theories on leprosy’s etiology. The most dramatic hypothesis (literally and figuratively) may have been proposed by the ghost of Prince Hamlet’s father in Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet. The ghost recounted the onset of a lethal “lazar-like … vile and loathsome crust” after being poisoned with a “leperous distilment” by the king’s regicidal brother, Claudius (who then usurped the throne—and queen—of Denmark) (Hamlet. Act 1



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The Dark History of White Spots

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

The stigmatization of patients with “white spots” on their skin dates back several millennia. For much of this time, a clear distinction was not made among the various disorders of hypopigmentation. In the Hebrew Bible, Leviticus 13 described a number of such disorders under the broad term Zoraat, denoting white spots. Zoraat was a sign of sin and punishment from God, and the afflicted were considered “unclean” and decreed to live alone. Around 250 bce, Ptolemy II ordered the translation of the



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Carlo Forlanini, the Dermatologist Who Invented the Cure for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

Carlo Forlanini was born in 1847 in Milan, Italy, and was the son of Federico Forlanini, the primary doctor from Milan’s Fatebenefratelli Hospital. Carlo was the elder brother of Enrico Forlanini, an inventor and aeronautical pioneer well known for his works on helicopters, aircraft, hydrofoils, and dirigibles. Forlanini joined the faculty of medicine at the University of Pavia. In 1866, he volunteered to serve under Giuseppe Garibaldi, and in 1870 he graduated with a thesis focused on cutaneous



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Saving Their Skins How Animals Protect From the Sun

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

A distinctive evolutionary change experienced by our ancestors as they branched away from their fellow apes was the loss of body hair. While this may have had certain benefits, our species has also suffered drawbacks; for one, without thick fur or hair to scatter sunlight, our skin is more susceptible to burning in the sun. Indeed, sunburns have been observed in other relatively hairless members of the animal kingdom, including whales, dolphins, fish, elephants, and rhinoceroses. But just as hum



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The Ethnic Health and Beauty Section in the US Army and Air Force Post Exchange System

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

The US Department of Defense establishes retail stores (known individually as a post or base exchange [PX or BX]) on military bases to let military personnel buy consumer goods at low cost. Even in combat zones, rudimentary exchanges are often set up within days—or even hours—of the military’s arrival. The shelves of frontline exchanges are well stocked with comfort and convenience items, such as candy, tobacco products, magazines, and personal hygiene items.




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JAMA Dermatology

from ArchDerm - 01 Sep 14

Mission Statement: JAMA Dermatology publishes information concerning the skin, its diseases, and their treatment. Its mission is to explicate the structure and function of the skin and its diseases and the art of using this information to deliver optimal medical and surgical care to the patient. We attempt to enhance the understanding of cutaneous pathophysiology and improve the clinician's ability to diagnose and treat skin disorders. This journal has a particular interest in publishing clinica


 

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