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Risks of youth rugby need urgent scrutiny

from MNTpaeds - 08 Jan 15

The unknown risks of youth rugby need urgent assessment to ensure the safety of junior players, says a senior doctor in The BMJ.



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Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in children and teens

from MNTpaeds - 08 Jan 15

A new study of twins suggests that insomnia in childhood and adolescence is partially explained by genetic factors.



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12-year study confirms overall safety of measles vaccines

from MNTpaeds - 08 Jan 15

A 12-year study of two measles-containing vaccines, published in Pediatrics, found that seven main adverse outcomes were unlikely after either vaccine.



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Exercise during pregnancy confers blood pressure benefits to kids

from MNTpaeds - 08 Jan 15

It's been well established among doctors and researchers alike, that babies with lower birth weight have a greater risk of having high blood pressure later in life.



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Respiratory syncytial virus infection may be associated with higher risk for bacterial pneumonia

from MNTpaeds - 07 Jan 15

Two common and sometimes dangerous respiratory diseases, a viral one caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and a bacterial one caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae may be linked, suggests a...



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Cooler temperatures encourage replication of cold virus

from MNTpaeds - 07 Jan 15

The common cold virus can reproduce itself more efficiently in the cooler temperatures found inside the nose than at core body temperature, according to a new Yale-led study.



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Genetic factors may contribute to insomnia in children, teens

from MNTpaeds - 07 Jan 15

A new study of twins suggests that insomnia in childhood and adolescence is partially explained by genetic factors.



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Small screens in the bedroom hinder children's sleep

from MNTpaeds - 06 Jan 15

Researchers report that sleeping in the same room as smartphones or other devices with small screens can have a negative impact on the amount of sleep that schoolchildren get.



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Is prolonged rest the best medicine for concussion?

from MNTpaeds - 06 Jan 15

Although strict rest - sometimes for several days, in a darkened room - is standard care for concussed patients, a new study suggests it may actually impede recovery.



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BMC receives award to improve care for pediatric patients with complex health issues

from MNTpaeds - 05 Jan 15

Boston Medical Center (BMC) has received a $6.1 million award from the U.S. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to establish the Massachusetts Alliance for Complex Care (MACC) and expand...



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Why It Matters to Know the Relationship Between Child Abuse and Neglect and Sexual Offending

from ArchPedi - 05 Jan 15

The link between child abuse and neglect and later problems has been addressed in many studies. An Institute of Medicine report reviewed child abuse and neglect outcomes and documented a broad range of deleterious effects on health, mental health, antisocial behavior, and social and economic functioning. The studies reviewed had varying degrees of methodical rigor; prospective studies with control groups of nonabused children are most likely to definitively answer the important questions.



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Effect of Expanding Medicaid for Parents on Children’s Health Insurance Coverage Lessons From the Oregon Experiment

from ArchPedi - 05 Jan 15

ImportanceIn the United States, health insurance is not universal. Observational studies show an association between uninsured parents and children. This association persisted even after expansions in child-only public health insurance. Oregon’s randomized Medicaid expansion for adults, known as the Oregon Experiment, created a rare opportunity to assess causality between parent and child coverage.ObjectiveTo estimate the effect on a child’s health insurance coverage status when (1) a parent ran



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A Prospective Examination of Whether Childhood Sexual Abuse Predicts Subsequent Sexual Offending

from ArchPedi - 05 Jan 15

ImportanceChildhood sexual abuse has been assumed to increase the risk for sexual offending. However, despite methodological limitations of prior research, public policies and clinical practice have been based on this assumption.ObjectiveTo empirically examine the commonly held belief that sexually abused children grow up to become sexual offenders and specialize in sex crimes.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsThis prospective cohort study and archival records check included cases and control ind



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Project pinpoints 12 new genetic causes of developmental disorders

from MNTpaeds - 04 Jan 15

The first results to emerge from a nationwide project to study the genetic causes of rare developmental disorders have revealed 12 causative genes that have never been identified before.



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High IV doses of the antibiotic vancomycin increase the risk of kidney damage in children

from MNTpaeds - 03 Jan 15

Results of a small Johns Hopkins Children's Center study show that hospitalized children given high-dose IV infusions of the antibiotic vancomycin to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections face...



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CDC: current US flu season at threshold for 'epidemic' status

from MNTpaeds - 02 Jan 15

According to the latest figures from the CDC's flu surveillance report, the flu season is at the epidemic level threshold, with 15 flu-related deaths reported among children.



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A different drug regimen could be considered for children where multiple parasite species cause malaria

from MNTpaeds - 02 Jan 15

A different drug regimen could be considered for children where multiple parasite species cause malariaA drug combination of artemisinin-naphthoquine should be considered for the treatment of...



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When child involved in school-based, community obesity intervention, parents lose weight too

from MNTpaeds - 02 Jan 15

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits.



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New concussion laws result in big jump in concussion treatment

from MNTpaeds - 02 Jan 15

New laws regulating concussion treatment, bolstered by heightened public awareness, have resulted in a large increase in the treatment of concussion-related injuries for school-age athletes.



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Overweight teens lose weight for the right reasons, study shows

from MNTpaeds - 02 Jan 15

Most heavy teens' attempts to lose weight don't work, but a new study shows a big secret of those who do succeed.




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Advancing Children’s Rights and Ensuring the Well-being of Children

from ArchPedi - 01 Jan 15

On November 20, 2014, the global community will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most comprehensive international legal instrument on children’s rights. The Convention is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history, ratified by 194 countries. Only the United States, Somalia, and South Sudan have not ratified it. The United States signed the Convention in 1995 but, almost 20 years later, the United States has taken no furt



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Universal State Newborn Screening Programs Can Reduce Health Disparities

from ArchPedi - 01 Jan 15

Fifty years after the advent of state newborn screening (NBS) programs for a metabolic condition, there is evidence that the decision to mandate universal screening can reduce health disparities. When in-hospital screening for phenylketonuria began in the early 1960s, most hospitals simply added the procedure to the list of routine clinical practices for newborns, such as giving vitamin K. For a variety of reasons, including fear of missed cases, advocates managed to get state governments involv



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Ensuring Access to the Appropriate Health Care Professionals Regionalization and Centralization of Care in a New Era of Health Care Financing and Delivery

from ArchPedi - 01 Jan 15

Infants born prematurely continue to make up almost 11.5% of the more than 4 million deliveries in the United States, with 1.4% of these deliveries occurring at a gestational age of 28 weeks or less. The work of Kastenberg et al, published in this issue of JAMA Pediatrics, adds to the extensive literature showing that delivery at a high-volume/high-level neonatal intensive care unit is associated with lower mortality and morbidity linked with premature birth. Given the high cost of delivering ca



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Continued Promise of School Breakfast Programs for Improving Academic Outcomes Breakfast Is Still the Most Important Meal of the Day

from ArchPedi - 01 Jan 15

A groundbreaking study, published in this journal nearly 25 years ago, documented improved academic outcomes among low-income schoolchildren who received school breakfast via the School Breakfast Program (SBP) vs those who did not, including significantly decreased tardiness and absences and improved performance on standardized tests of academic achievement. Since that time, the empirical study of school breakfast initiatives has increased substantially, with several literature reviews documenti


 

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