• Find us on Facebook
  • Follow BMJ OnExamination on Twitter

Latest News

Like this article?

Click vote now

0

Strange Bedfellows

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Brünauer-Fuhs-Siemens syndrome, or keratosis palmoplantaris striata type 1 (OMIM 148700), is caused by mutations in desmoglein 1. Between 1924 and 1929, 3 German-speaking dermatologists described this disease. While their names are always grouped together in this eponym, it is difficult to imagine a more unlikely trio.



0

The Forehead Scar as a Literary Device

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Dermatologists and patients often view scars as imperfections. In literature, however, scars can help define a nuanced character, often revealing more than other aspects of a character’s appearance. Does the scar connote bravery, some triumph in battle? Or, could it mean something more sinister, a memento of treachery perhaps?



0

From Elizabeth Bennet to Barbie Sun Tanning Through the Ages

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Never mind the little black dress; Coco Chanel’s most lasting contribution to the world of style—and, unfortunately, to dermatology—may well be the suntan. For centuries, in a fashion statement freighted with racial undertones, women around the world coveted a fair complexion. Ancient Egyptians lightened their skin with myrrh and frankincense. Eighth-century Japanese women risked death, using lead and mercury as whiteners. Intent on showing they had never needed to labor under the sun, 18th-cent



0

The Men or Women Behind Nevi: Alfred Guido Miescher

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

The man behind Miescher nevus is Alfred Guido Miescher. He was born on November 4, 1887, in Naples, Italy. His mother was Marietta Berner, and his father, Max Eduard Miescher, was a businessman. He was the nephew of Johannes Friedrich Miescher (1844-1895), professor of pathophysiology at the University of Basel, Switzerland, and discoverer of nucleic acids. After the father’s death, he followed his mother to Basel, her hometown, where Guido completed his school.



0

JAMA Dermatology

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Mission Statement: JAMA Dermatology publishes information concerning the skin, its diseases, and their treatment. Its mission is to explicate the structure and function of the skin and its diseases and the art of using this information to deliver optimal medical and surgical care to the patient. We attempt to enhance the understanding of cutaneous pathophysiology and improve the clinician's ability to diagnose and treat skin disorders. This journal has a particular interest in publishing clinica



0

New study shows flu vaccine reduced children's risk of intensive care unit flu admission by three-fourths

from MNTpaeds - 31 Mar 14

Getting a flu vaccine reduces a child's risk of flu-related intensive care hospitalization by 74 percent, according to a CDC study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. The study is the first to estimate vaccine effectiveness (VE) against flu admissions to pediatric intensive care units (PICU).



0

Disadvantaged children attending early childhood development programs have significantly improved health as adults

from MNTpaeds - 31 Mar 14

The study was led by researchers from UCL (University College London), the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina. These findings build upon existing evidence that high-quality early childhood programs produce better economic and social outcomes for disadvantaged children.



0

4 in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments

from MNTpaeds - 31 Mar 14

In a study of 14,000 U.S. children, 40 percent lack strong emotional bonds - what psychologists call "secure attachment" - with their parents that are crucial to success later in life, according to a new report. The researchers found that these children are more likely to face educational and behavioral problems.



0

Public resistance to soda tax, size restrictions

from MNTpaeds - 31 Mar 14

Those hoping to dilute Americans' taste for soda, energy drinks, sweetened tea, and other sugary beverages should take their quest to school lunchrooms rather than legislative chambers, according to a recent study by media and health policy experts.Soda taxes and beverage portion size restrictions were unpalatable to the 1,319 U.S.



0

Closure of coal plant in China led to improvements in children's health

from MNTpaeds - 30 Mar 14

Decreased exposure to air pollution in utero is linked with improved childhood developmental scores and higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key protein for brain development, according to a study looking at the closure of a coal-burning power plant in China led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health.



0

Evaluating therapies for Menkes disease using PET scanning

from MNTpaeds - 29 Mar 14

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies in Japan have used PET imaging to visualize the distribution in the body of copper, which is deregulated in Menkes disease, a genetic disorder, using a mouse model. This study lays the groundwork for PET imaging studies on human Menkes disease patients to identify new therapy options.



0

CDC: autism rates soar 30% in 2 years

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

The number of US children with autism spectrum disorder has soared approximately 30% in the past 2 years, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In the surveillance summary report, published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers estimate that 1 in 68 children (14.



0

Pediatric Praziquantel Consortium expands into Brazil

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

Brazilian Farmanguinhos, part of Fiocruz, and UK-based Simcyp are reinforcing the international non-profit Pediatric Praziquantel Consortium. The aim of the Consortium is to develop and register a new pediatric formulation against schistosomiasis for preschool-age children, a group currently lacking a suitable treatment.



0

Quality early childhood programs help prevent chronic diseases in later life

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

Disadvantaged children who attend high-quality early childhood development programs including healthcare and nutrition have significantly improved health as adults, reports a new study.The study was led by researchers from UCL (University College London), the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina.



0

Overweight teens at increased risk for early death

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

Although people live longer today than they did 50 years ago, people who were overweight and obese as teenagers aren't experiencing the same gains as other segments of the population, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).The life expectancy of the average American born in 2011 was 78.7 years, according to the U.S.



0

Scientists unravel nerve-cell death in rare children's disease

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

A team of scientists, led by Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of the Neuroscience and Aging Research Center at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), recently discovered why cerebellar granule cell neurons in patients suffering from ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) were unable to repair DNA damage and thus died.



0

Smoking bans linked with decline in preterm births, asthma

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

During the last couple of decades, public smoking bans in the US and Europe have come into effect. Now, the first systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect of this smoke-free legislation on child health shows these bans have been followed by decreasing rates of preterm births and children attending the hospital for asthma.



0

Gene implicated in inherited muscle diseases

from MNTpaeds - 28 Mar 14

Skeletal muscle cells with unevenly spaced nuclei, or nuclei in the wrong location, are telltale signs of such inherited muscle diseases as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, which occurs in one out of every 100,000 births, and centronuclear myopathy, which affects one out of every 50,000 infants.



0

Less children found to be at risk of low vitamin D levels

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

Under new guidelines from the Institute of Medicine, the estimated number of children who are at risk of having insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D is drastically reduced from previous estimates, according to a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study.



0

Being sexually coerced not an uncommon experience for young men, teenage boys

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

A large proportion of teenage boys and college men report having been coerced into sex or sexual behavior, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.



0

Children suffer impaired learning of the natural world when exposed to books which have animals with human traits

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

A new study by University of Toronto researchers has found that kids' books featuring animals with human characteristics not only lead to less factual learning but also influence children's reasoning about animals.



0

Experts in London suggest that penicillin prescriptions risk under-dosing children

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

Millions of children in the UK are potentially receiving penicillin prescriptions below the recommended dose for common infections, according to new research led jointly by researchers at King's College London, St George's, University of London and Imperial College London.



0

Economic growth has little impact on reducing undernutrition in children

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

A large study of child growth patterns in 36 developing countries published in The Lancet Global Health journal has found that, contrary to widely held beliefs, economic growth is at best associated with very small, and in some cases no declines in levels of stunting, underweight, and wasting.



0

Newborn screening: should whole genome sequencing be introduced?

from MNTpaeds - 27 Mar 14

Whole genome sequencing is becoming more popular in medical research. With its falling cost and increasing reliability, some scientists hail the process as being the future of genetic research. But should whole genome sequencing be used as a part of newborn screening programs? This is a question that researchers from McGill University in Canada say should be addressed.



0

Availability of sugar-sweetened beverages in schools increases odds of adolescent obesity

from MNTpaeds - 26 Mar 14

The availability and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in secondary schools is associated with higher adolescent obesity rates in British Columbia (BC), Canada, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.


 

1238 items Page 5 of 50 << 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >>

    Search

    Categories

    Keyword cloud

    Abstract blood Body brain breast cardiac Cardiovascular chronic diabetes England exposure gene genetic included lung Mar performed Physical protein Randomized screening supplied Surgical trials Volume

    Top news voters

    nathanleader222 votes
    askarh411 vote

    © 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd . All rights reserved.