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The long-term consequences of nutrition during the first two years of life

from MNTpaeds - 03 Apr 14

Many studies have focused on the influence of breast-feeding on child health. From analysis of data from the ELANCE cohort, Marie Françoise Rolland-Cachera, former researcher at Inserm and her co-workers in the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN)[1] have shown that breast-feeding has a protective effect on the risk of obesity at 20 years of age.



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Childhood obstructive sleep apnea: new screening tool developed

from MNTpaeds - 03 Apr 14

A new screening tool has been developed by clinical investigators at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in children. Their findings are published in Pediatric Pulmonology. Evidence suggests that adults with a large neck circumference are more likely to develop obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), especially males.



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Infant circumcision is becoming less common in the US, but why?

from MNTpaeds - 02 Apr 14

Male circumcision is a controversial procedure, with passionate voices on both the pro- and anti- sides of the debate. Now, new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings bolsters the pro-circumcision argument, claiming that the "benefits" of circumcision "far outweigh risks.



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Research provides new insight into rural versus urban causes of childhood concussion

from MNTpaeds - 02 Apr 14

Researchers at Western University have found youth living in rural areas are more likely to sustain concussions from injuries involving motorized vehicles such as all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes, whereas youth living in urban areas suffer concussions mostly as a result of sports. Hockey accounts for 40 per cent of those injuries.



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Genetic cause of heart valve defects

from MNTpaeds - 02 Apr 14

Heart valve defects are a common cause of death in newborns. Scientists at the University of Bonn and the caesar research center have discovered "Creld1" is a key gene for the development of heart valves in mice. The researchers were able to show that a similar Creld1 gene found in humans functions via the same signaling pathway as in the mouse.



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Antibiotics being explored for the treatment of cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy have the potential to trigger autoimmune disease

from MNTcf - 02 Apr 14

The code for every gene includes a message at the end of it that signals the translation machinery to stop. Some diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy, can result from mutations that insert this stop signal into the middle of an essential gene, causing the resulting protein to be truncated.



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Children in the US: 1 in 3 may have high cholesterol

from MNTpaeds - 01 Apr 14

Approximately 1 in 3 children in the US may have borderline or high cholesterol, according to a new study recently presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session.The research team, led by Dr.



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FDA approves Topamax for migraine prevention in adolescents

from MNTpaeds - 01 Apr 14

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Topamax (topiramate) for prevention (prophylaxis) of migraine headaches in adolescents ages 12 to 17. This is the first FDA approval of a drug for migraine prevention in this age group. The medication is taken on a daily basis to reduce the frequency of migraine headaches. Topamax was first approved by the FDA in 1996 to prevent seizures.



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Obesity prevention programs can lower kids' blood pressure, even if they don't reduce body fat

from MNTpaeds - 01 Apr 14

One of the serious health consequences of obesity is elevated blood pressure (BP), a particular problem in children because research has found that high BP in children usually follows them into adulthood, carrying with it a wide range of possible negative consequences.Even modest elevations in the BP of adolescents, according to recent research, can pose cardiovascular problems later in life.



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Prognosis of children with deadly inherited disorder may be improved by repeated hUCB injections

from MNTpaeds - 01 Apr 14

New insight has been gained into treating an inherited disorder that creates serious neurological and behavioral disabilities in children and usually leads to death in the teen years.




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Development of a Tongue-Piercing Method for Use With Assistive Technology

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Piercing the tongue for wearing jewelry is not infrequent among young adults. The procedure is not usually performed by medical personnel. A new assistive technology for people with tetraplegia, the Tongue Drive System (TDS), utilizes voluntary tongue movements for control. The operator uses a magnet attached to the tongue together with an externally mounted sensor array that detects changes in the magnetic field to drive powered wheelchairs and access computers. We hypothesized that a magnet-co



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Expression of Phosphodiesterase-5 in Lymphatic Malformation Tissue

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are uncommon and sometimes debilitating congenital vascular anomalies that presumably arise because of developmental dysplasia of the lymphatic network in utero. They comprise primitive lymphatic sacs surrounded by a thickened layer of connective tissue and interspersed muscle fibers. Current treatments for LM are palliative and only partially successful and include compression, surgical resection, laser ablation, and sclerotherapy. A recent report by Swetman and co



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Improving Accessibility to Inpatient Dermatology Through Teledermatology

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Inpatient dermatology as a subspecialty has matured during the past decade. However, even when admitted for a dermatologic-specific diagnosis, only 51% of patients receive a dermatologic consultation. Several factors contribute to the lack of accessible dermatologists, including the dermatologic workforce shortage, the location of most dermatologists in outpatient settings away from hospitals, low remuneration for time spent in the hospital, unease in caring for the diseases seen in hospitalized



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Multibranched Acquired Periungual Fibrokeratoma

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

We have encountered a case of multibranched acquired periungual fibrokeratoma (APF).



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Treatment of Giant Cellulitis-like Sweet Syndrome With Dapsone

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory condition characterized by the abrupt development of erythematous plaques accompanied by fever and neutrophilia. Different clinical presentations of this disorder have been described in the literature. We read with interest a recent report in JAMA Dermatology describing a new clinical variant of Sweet syndrome, namely, giant cellulitis-like Sweet syndrome. Clinically these patients develop large, red erythematous plaques that recur and often are misdiagnosed as



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Toward a Practical Renaming of Bullous Pemphigoid and All Its Variants Cutaneous Pemphigoid

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

To the Editor We read with interest the study of Bakker et al emphasizing that pruritus is an important symptom of bullous pemphigoid (BP). Nevertheless, a number of points warrant respectful comment.



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Toward a Practical Renaming of Bullous Pemphigoid and All Its Variants—Reply

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

In Reply We are pleased to see that our article has evoked a relevant discussion on the naming of bullous pemphigoid (BP) and its nonbullous variants.



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Error in Byline

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

In the Observation entitled “Eruptive Cherry Hemangiomatosis Associated With Multicentric Castleman Disease: A Case Report and Diagnostic Clue,” published in the February 2013 issue of JAMADermatology (2013;149[2]:204-208. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.1552), the first author’s name should have been given as David C. Fajgenbaum. This article was corrected online.



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The Rob

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

The Journal of Cutaneous DiseasesApril 1914MEDICAL RECORD(June 7, 1913, lxxxiii, No. 93)Abstracted by Louis Chargin, M.D.THE ROB. J. B. Stein, p. 1020This is an interesting exposition of the remedies, the so called “Robs,” secret specifics (antisyphilitic) of much vogue in the 18th and 19th centuries in France and other countries. It was first introduced in 1761 and is supposedly still on the market. The paper is of historical interest.J Cutan Dis. 1914;32(4):335.



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Strange Bedfellows

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Brünauer-Fuhs-Siemens syndrome, or keratosis palmoplantaris striata type 1 (OMIM 148700), is caused by mutations in desmoglein 1. Between 1924 and 1929, 3 German-speaking dermatologists described this disease. While their names are always grouped together in this eponym, it is difficult to imagine a more unlikely trio.



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The Forehead Scar as a Literary Device

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Dermatologists and patients often view scars as imperfections. In literature, however, scars can help define a nuanced character, often revealing more than other aspects of a character’s appearance. Does the scar connote bravery, some triumph in battle? Or, could it mean something more sinister, a memento of treachery perhaps?



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From Elizabeth Bennet to Barbie Sun Tanning Through the Ages

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Never mind the little black dress; Coco Chanel’s most lasting contribution to the world of style—and, unfortunately, to dermatology—may well be the suntan. For centuries, in a fashion statement freighted with racial undertones, women around the world coveted a fair complexion. Ancient Egyptians lightened their skin with myrrh and frankincense. Eighth-century Japanese women risked death, using lead and mercury as whiteners. Intent on showing they had never needed to labor under the sun, 18th-cent



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The Men or Women Behind Nevi: Alfred Guido Miescher

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

The man behind Miescher nevus is Alfred Guido Miescher. He was born on November 4, 1887, in Naples, Italy. His mother was Marietta Berner, and his father, Max Eduard Miescher, was a businessman. He was the nephew of Johannes Friedrich Miescher (1844-1895), professor of pathophysiology at the University of Basel, Switzerland, and discoverer of nucleic acids. After the father’s death, he followed his mother to Basel, her hometown, where Guido completed his school.



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JAMA Dermatology

from ArchDerm - 01 Apr 14

Mission Statement: JAMA Dermatology publishes information concerning the skin, its diseases, and their treatment. Its mission is to explicate the structure and function of the skin and its diseases and the art of using this information to deliver optimal medical and surgical care to the patient. We attempt to enhance the understanding of cutaneous pathophysiology and improve the clinician's ability to diagnose and treat skin disorders. This journal has a particular interest in publishing clinica


 

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