• Find us on Facebook
  • Follow BMJ OnExamination on Twitter

Latest News

Like this article?

Click vote now

0

Highlights

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14



0

Relieving Pain in America Insights From an Institute of Medicine Committee

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

This Viewpoint discusses how the Institute of Medicine stands behind the estimate that 100 million Americans have chronic pain and the committee’s recommendation that better data are needed to create the cultural transformation required to reduce the effects of pain in America.



0

Use of Clinical Preventive Services in Infants, Children, and Adolescents

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

This Viewpoint discusses clinical preventive services in children and adolescents and provides important insights into screening practices in the United States



0

The Historic Role of Boards of Health in Local Innovation New York City’s Soda Portion Case

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

This Viewpoint discusses the role that boards of health have had throughout history in relation to the soda portion rule in New York City.



0

The PCORI Perspective on Patient-Centered Outcomes Research

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

This Viewpoint discusses the meaning of patient-centeredness in research and reasons for conducting patient-centered outcomes research.



0

Ash Wednesday

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

This past April, I was asked by my hospital’s Pastoral Care Department to help out with their Ash Wednesday services. Ash Wednesday is the busiest day of the year for pastoral care, a sort of spiritual Black Friday, and the office phone started ringing at 6 am, nurses and supervisors calling in states of high anxiety to make sure that the ashes were coming for the patients or employees under their care. That’s when it’s all hands on deck, getting feet and thumbs attached to those little pots of



0

What Makes a Good Quality Measure?

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

In this issue of JAMA, reports on the relationship between clinical outcomes and quality measures by Neuman and colleagues and Howell and colleagues facilitate reflection on the attributes of good quality measures. These studies raise issues that are familiar to experts in quality measurement but may not be understood by physicians and others whose performance is being assessed. Although the reports present information on a variety of types of measures, this Editorial focuses on the clinical qua



0

Climate Change A Continuing Threat to the Health of the World’s Population

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

Poverty and war are among the two greatest threats to health and well-being. In virtually every study, poverty emerges as a major risk factor for most diseases. The tragedies of 9/11 and the current conflicts in the Middle East are painful reminders of the human toll and societal cost of war. Yet poverty and war are seldom addressed by most national and international medical organizations. They have generally focused on the advancement of science, public and individual health, access to care, an



0

Effect of High-Dose Vitamin D 3 on Hospital Length of Stay in Critically Ill Patients With Vitamin D Deficiency The VITdAL-ICU Randomized Clinical Trial

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

ImportanceLow vitamin D status is linked to increased mortality and morbidity in patients who are critically ill. It is unknown if this association is causal.ObjectiveTo investigate whether a vitamin D3 treatment regimen intended to restore and maintain normal vitamin D status over 6 months is of health benefit for patients in ICUs.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsA randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center trial, conducted from May 2010 through September 2012 at 5 ICUs that inc



0

Association Between Hospital-Level Obstetric Quality Indicators and Maternal and Neonatal Morbidity

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

ImportanceIn an effort to improve the quality of care, several obstetric-specific quality measures are now monitored and publicly reported. The extent to which these measures are associated with maternal and neonatal morbidity is not known.ObjectiveTo examine whether 2 Joint Commission obstetric quality indicators are associated with maternal and neonatal morbidity.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsPopulation-based observational study using linked New York City discharge and birth certificate dat



0

Association Between Skilled Nursing Facility Quality Indicators and Hospital Readmissions

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

ImportanceHospital readmissions are common, costly, and potentially preventable. Little is known about the association between available skilled nursing facility (SNF) performance measures and the risk of hospital readmission.ObjectiveTo measure the association between SNF performance measures and hospital readmissions among Medicare beneficiaries receiving postacute care at SNFs in the United States.Design and ParticipantsUsing national Medicare data on fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries di



0

Association Between Vancomycin Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Mortality Among Patients With Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

ImportanceStaphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a worldwide problem. It is unclear whether higher-vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is associated with mortality. This potential association has direct consequences for patients and public health.Data SourcesPubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Evidence-based Medicine BMJ, and the American College of Physicians Journal Club were searched from inception through April 2014.Study SelectionStudies reporting mortality and vancomycin



0

Climate Change Challenges and Opportunities for Global Health

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

ImportanceHealth is inextricably linked to climate change. It is important for clinicians to understand this relationship in order to discuss associated health risks with their patients and to inform public policy.ObjectivesTo provide new US-based temperature projections from downscaled climate modeling and to review recent studies on health risks related to climate change and the cobenefits of efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.Data Sources, Study Selection, and Data SynthesisWe searc




0

Drugs for MRSA Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which was traditionally a nosocomially-acquired organism but now frequently occurs in the absence of health care exposure, is the predominant cause of suppurative skin and soft-tissue infections in many parts of the US. Community-associated MRSA usually causes furunculosis, purulent cellulitis, and abscesses, but necrotizing fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, and sepsis can also occur.



0

Emergency Department Visits by Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults in California by Insurance Status, 2005-2010

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

Concerns regarding cost, continuity of care, and crowding continue to bring emergency department (ED) use under nationwide scrutiny. Although many hope that increasing insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act will lead to decreases in ED visits, recent evidence in adults suggests that increasing access to specifically Medicaid insurance may actually be associated with increased ED use. This ongoing discussion regarding the association between insurance coverage and ED use, however, has



0

Benefits and Risks Associated With Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

To the Editor Dr Chatterjee and colleagues performed a meta-analysis comparing thrombolysis with anticoagulation for pulmonary embolism using the Peto method to determine pooled odds ratios (ORs) because of low expected event rates among included trials. We suggest that this method is flawed for several reasons.



0

Benefits and Risks Associated With Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

To the Editor The optimal treatment of intermediate-risk patients with pulmonary embolism (hemodynamically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction or increased cardiac biomarkers) is an important issue, and the meta-analysis by Dr Chatterjee and colleagues showed a reduction in mortality with the use of thrombolysis compared with anticoagulation in this group of patients. However, in my opinion caution is due in interpreting these results.



0

Benefits and Risks Associated With Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism—Reply

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

In Reply Dr Bradford and colleagues suggest that the Peto method of determination of pooled ORs may be flawed because the event rates for mortality in pulmonary embolism trials were approximately 3%. However, at event rates less than 5%, the Peto method provides the least biased estimates of treatment effect when compared with the corrected Mantel-Haenszel, DerSimonian-Laird, and inverse-variance ORs.



0

Recurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

To the Editor Dr Finkelstein and colleagues used hospital discharge data to determine the incidence and risk of recurrence of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, which are rare serious conditions. The authors did not review medical records.



0

Recurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis—Reply

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

In Reply Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are rare disorders. To study their recurrence over time, large data sets are needed. This precludes a case-by-case examination of medical records.



0

Commitment Devices to Improve Unhealthy Behaviors

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

To the Editor A Viewpoint by Dr Rogers and colleagues discussed the underuse of commitment devices to improve unhealthy behaviors. The authors underlined 2 basic features of these devices: their voluntary use by patients who want to change behaviors and their reinforcement of consequences related to failed goal achievement by patients.



0

Commitment Devices to Improve Unhealthy Behaviors—Reply

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

In Reply Our Viewpoint described commitment devices and argued that they should be more widely used in health care. Commitment devices enforce voluntarily imposed restrictions on people until they have accomplished their goals or enforce voluntarily imposed penalties if they do not accomplish their goals.



0

Clarification of Inaccurate Statement

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

The editors would like to clarify the last sentence of the first paragraph of the Brief Report entitled “Medical Communication Companies and Industry Grants” published in the December 18, 2013, issue of JAMA, as we believe the sentence could be read as suggesting that all medical communication companies participate in certain marketing activities, which is not accurate. The authors disagree with this interpretation and the need for a clarification. The sentence has been modified online to read



0

Clarification

from JAMA - 15 Oct 14

In the Brief Report entitled “Medical Communication Companies and Industry Grants” published in the December 18, 2013, issue of JAMA (2013;310[23]:2554-2558. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.281638), the last sentence of the first paragraph in the article requires clarification. It should read: “Known best for arranging continuing medical education (CME) programs, they also may develop prelaunch and branding campaigns and produce digital and print publications.” This article was corrected online.


 

1012 items Page 1 of 41 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >>

    Search

    Categories

    Keyword cloud

    Abstract back blood body brain breast cardiac change chronic Coupons diabetes doctor dog Ebola genetic great Lancet Lung Oct pain Reviews Screening supplied UK weight

    Top news voters

    dr_el_taweel1 vote
    magy.sobhy821 vote

    © 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd . All rights reserved.